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Diaphone Jim 06-25-2020 10:56 AM

I would guess that the road surface in the second iron horse pic is made of individual bricks or some other kind of pavers.
I have never seen one. Where was that? Does it still exist?
I would love to see photos of its construction.

Happy Monkey 06-25-2020 12:41 PM

Look up "cobblestone road construction".

xoxoxoBruce 06-27-2020 10:24 PM

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I'm a little wary of this rig. Maybe on level ground but I think I'd put outriggers on it anyway.

Diaphone Jim 06-28-2020 01:39 PM

I saw one like it recently and liked it.
Gotta watch the center of gravity to avoid the Porsche prob of a week or so ago.

Gravdigr 07-04-2020 10:43 PM

This shit is bananas:


xoxoxoBruce 07-04-2020 11:08 PM

Looks like it cuts it off at the end too. The pieces of tubing are part of the design of something so the know all the lengths, radius of the bends and the angles, and probably on a drawing somewhere. So all they had to do is build this two stage machine. Stage one to read the drawing and stage two bend the tubing. Still has to have a human there with rag in hand to grab the piece when the machine cuts it off to precisely the right length.


Check this out the video of this guy working on an old car. The video is basically boring but he runs into a clearance problem with a spark plug socket. At about 14:00 he solves the problem in the most dangerous way I can think of. :facepalm:


Diaphone Jim 07-05-2020 11:28 AM

Grav: No crimps!
Bruce: "Boring" is generous. I don't have a power wrench, but if I did, I would not use it on plugs.

Gravdigr 07-05-2020 12:49 PM

JFC, dude! Just remove the head bolt.

Geez, how hard can ya make something?!

xoxoxoBruce 07-06-2020 01:03 AM

Taking out a head bolt can be tricky. One, the spark plug might be in the way. ;)
Also head bolts usually have a torquing order and may be torque to yield bolts that can't be reused.
I'd have chucked it up like he did but taken it down with a portable grinder.
Even a file or coarse sandpaper would have been safer.

Gravdigr 07-06-2020 04:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xoxoxoBruce (Post 1054861)
Taking out a head bolt can be tricky. One, the spark plug might be in the way. ;)

What you did there, I see it.

xoxoxoBruce 07-14-2020 04:42 AM

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These have been around for more than twenty years and nobody I know ever heard of them.

Attachment 71003


Griff 07-14-2020 05:48 AM

Cool idea! Bikes are getting torque crazy maybe there’s a market.

BigV 07-14-2020 11:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Griff (Post 1055213)
Cool idea! Bikes are getting torque crazy maybe there’s a market.

yeah but....


Where do you put the dot once you've adapted it for bikeland by making it an allen head?

Diaphone Jim 07-14-2020 12:15 PM

There are so many things wrong with the concept, the ad and the video, it makes my head spin.
They need to disappear for another 20 years.

xoxoxoBruce 07-14-2020 11:27 PM

What's wrong with the concept, I think it's a great idea. My concern is if it works reliably enough to be trusted.
There is no ad, and the guy who made the video has no connection with the company, just one of those hundreds of Utubers making entertainment.

They do a cost analysis showing the savings on selected applications.

- http://www.smartbolts.com/wp-content...ayJune2011.pdf

Diaphone Jim 07-15-2020 02:39 PM

The top part of your post is indeed an ad.
The video has some strange ways of testing and, even if the bolt has been sacrificed for the explanation, it hurts me to see it clamped by its threads in a vice.
I do not use either the break off at torque or the machining routine.
I don't see the strength spec of the colored bolts, but they are 12 times the cost of regular Grade 8's.
I really don't want the grade 8's holding my wheels on, my third member secure or my cylinder head tight with whatever those are with a hole drilled down the middle to install the stretchy part.
The cost of my torque wrenches are probably currently in the ranges of less than a penny per use.
I can't say there might not be a good place for them, but I don't have one.
So there, now we are equally grouchy.

BigV 07-15-2020 04:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Diaphone Jim (Post 1055266)
snip--
So there, now we are equally grouchy.

Bold words my friend, bold words.

xoxoxoBruce 07-16-2020 12:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Diaphone Jim (Post 1055266)
The top part of your post is indeed an ad.

No it is not. I'm quite sure be cause I made that from information I gathered and put together to email to some people who would be interested and I kiddingly accused of holding out on me.

Quote:

The video has some strange ways of testing and, even if the bolt has been sacrificed for the explanation, it hurts me to see it clamped by its threads in a vice.
How else would you find out how it works besides cutting it open? Worrying about the threads is like worrying the medical examiner doing the autopsy will pull the stiffs hair.

Quote:

I can't say there might not be a good place for them, but I don't have one.
The cost analysis shows not all applications warrant the high cost. Also different applications of the same size bolt often call out different torques so I doubt you'll find these in a hardware store.

xoxoxoBruce 07-18-2020 04:43 PM

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Fords make nice waterfalls..

Griff 07-19-2020 07:39 AM

I like how it's pouring out of the radiator...

xoxoxoBruce 07-26-2020 09:05 PM

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A spiffy Maris Transport truck taken at South Bend Indiana in the late 30's...

xoxoxoBruce 08-11-2020 12:14 AM

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When one has the responsibility of maintaining the lawn it wouldn't do to shirk that responsibility.
However we can comport ourselves in a civilized manor rather than suffer the slings and arrows of perspiration and ring around the collar.

Diaphone Jim 08-11-2020 01:48 PM

With two sources of CO to pump in, it could be a dream job.

Griff 08-11-2020 01:55 PM

lol Worse ways to go I guess.

Gravdigr 08-11-2020 06:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xoxoxoBruce (Post 1055762)
A spiffy Maris Transport truck taken at South Bend Indiana in the late 30's...

That hauler is so damn cool...

...and the black piece of sexiness on top is mine, so keep ya crummy dick-beaters off it!:mad:

Griff 08-12-2020 06:12 AM

That car has moonshiner written all over it. nice

Gravdigr 08-12-2020 09:44 PM

That would make a tanker. Take out the interior and build a giant tank for the white gold.

I miss me some corn-in-a-jar. Gonna be a while yet...Gotta get rid o'some o'these pills.

xoxoxoBruce 09-05-2020 03:16 AM

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Be safe, tie on your hard hat...

xoxoxoBruce 09-10-2020 09:52 PM

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The only civilized way to gawk at Mowgli and his pets.

BigV 09-14-2020 02:41 PM

Serious machines.



Diaphone Jim 09-17-2020 06:56 PM

I've been changing oil for about 65 years for myself, GF's, parents, kids, grandkids and friends.
I pour the drained oil into old milk or water jugs for recycling. (It is amazing how long oil recycling has been available).
I can't remember the first time I looked at what I had drained and wondered how it always happened that I had replaced it with substantially more.
Yesterday it was 3 5/8 quarts into my Pathfinder, as called for and perfect on the dipstick before and after.
Today I measured the oil I drained at 3 quarts.
This difference may be a less than I've noted 10+ times with 5+ vehicles.

Anybody noticed this phenomenon?
Anybody know why?
I have some ideas, but none I like.

Gravdigr 09-17-2020 07:23 PM

I have some ideas, also.

You won't like them either, too.

BigV 09-17-2020 08:32 PM

If you're not seeing something super obvious like drips or wet with oil or a puddle, consider this. You're not emptying the crankcase. There's oil in there even if you let it drain a long time. Also, you're probably changing the filter too, how much oil is in the dirty filter? And a certain amount of oil is going out the tailpipe. If your rings are bad then more is getting into the cylinder, but even a brand new engine has a positive crankcase ventilation system and some of that atomized oil is plumbed into the intake, and burned.

Some thoughts....

Diaphone Jim 09-18-2020 12:16 PM

Always change filter with contents joining drained oil in pan. (Except the 1/2 ounce or so that Nissan designed to get away to drip on floor. Always parked inside on same place on concrete.)
100,000 miles on engine, always full on dipstick, no add necessary between changes.
Baseline is the same: drain 'til no drip, start with 3 5/8 qts.
3000 to 4000 miles later the 1/2 quart or more is gone.

But keep in mind, I get the same mystery with other vehicles.

Grav: Try me with the bad possibilities.

sexobon 09-18-2020 08:44 PM

I too have always done my own oil changes. From twice a year, using regular oil, in my Datsun B210 V4 ... to now annually, using full synthetic (with Z-Max additive during wintertime) in my Hyundai Sonata V6.

As BigV said, all vehicles burn some oil. The more mileage there is on the vehicle, the more wear there is on the parts. As the parts wear down, the spaces between them become larger. More oil goes into those spaces; so, more oil is burned off. A half quart or so, over 3,000-4,000 miles, on a vehicle with 100,000 miles on it is not unheard of.

Your oil change interval suggests you're using regular oil rather than synthetic. Synthetics are expensive; but, more heat stable and you may see less burn-off. Synthetics can go for longer intervals between changes too, The engine could even last longer; however, it can't be a very old model with seals that aren't compatible with synthetics and the vehicle has to have been well maintained so there isn't already a potential leak. Synthetics will clean out sludge that may be plugging an existing leak.

A compromise may be to run a High Mileage Synthetic Blend in the engine at the next oil change. Those have additives to help plump up seals like when they were newer so they won't leak. It might cut down on the burn-off loss, do just a little cleaning, and slow down further engine wear. That' s what I would do in this situation. If there's no appreciable difference, you can always go back to just regular oil.

xoxoxoBruce 09-19-2020 01:03 AM

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Moving many...

Diaphone Jim 09-19-2020 11:19 AM

No doubt there are things I still need to learn after 60+ years of wrenching, but nothing mentioned here so far is one of them.

Diaphone Jim 09-19-2020 11:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xoxoxoBruce (Post 1058254)
Moving many...

Seems likely that is Australia.

Diaphone Jim 09-19-2020 11:29 AM

Chinese double-parked hauler. Might be 21 or?:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:C...ransporter.jpg

sexobon 09-19-2020 12:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Diaphone Jim (Post 1058285)
No doubt there are things I still need to learn after 60+ years of wrenching, but nothing mentioned here so far is one of them.

This isn't an automotive website. Use the right tool for the job.

xoxoxoBruce 09-19-2020 02:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Diaphone Jim (Post 1058287)
Chinese double-parked hauler. Might be 21 or?:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:C...ransporter.jpg

Looks like 21 to me, four door sedans too. Must be robust tires on that rig. :eek:
Quote:

This isn't an automotive website.
Sure it is, we do it all. :haha:

sexobon 09-19-2020 02:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xoxoxoBruce (Post 1058303)
... Sure it is, we do it all. :haha:

Jack of all trades... etc.

xoxoxoBruce 09-19-2020 04:12 PM

Absolutely, amateurs, anecdotal experiences, no expert instruction on any subject, no liability, no legal grounds to sue.

Diaphone Jim 09-19-2020 04:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sexobon (Post 1058292)
This isn't an automotive website. Use the right tool for the job.

I reached for it but got you.

sexobon 09-19-2020 04:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xoxoxoBruce (Post 1058313)
Absolutely, amateurs, anecdotal experiences, no expert instruction on any subject, no liability, no legal grounds to sue.

And no help either to hear DJ tell it...

Quote:

Originally Posted by Diaphone Jim (Post 1058285)
No doubt there are things I still need to learn after 60+ years of wrenching, but nothing mentioned here so far is one of them.

OTOH, the grumpy old men are hanging together instead of bickering with each other. That's nice. ;)

Gravdigr 09-20-2020 02:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sexobon (Post 1058292)
Use the right tool for the job.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Diaphone Jim (Post 1058314)
I reached for it but got you.

Well, ya still got hold of a tool.:jig:

Sorry, Sexo.:stickpoke

sexobon 09-20-2020 02:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gravdigr (Post 1058336)
Well, ya still got hold of a tool.:jig: ...

He can keep the job, I don't swing that way.

xoxoxoBruce 09-22-2020 10:12 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Gotta take the dogs along...

Diaphone Jim 09-23-2020 11:21 AM

Probably OK, but it doesn't seem like a good place.

xoxoxoBruce 09-23-2020 12:28 PM

Better than in the trailer and the exhaust stream is up high.

glatt 09-23-2020 08:11 PM

The only downside I see is that if I were in one of those pods, I would get dizzy trying to look at individual objects on the side of the road as we speed by. Too much eye motion. Otherwise, it looks kind of fun, assuming it's big enough to lie down.

Diaphone Jim 09-24-2020 11:30 AM

Kind of brings ol' Mitt Romney to mind.
The new one ain't much better.

Gravdigr 09-24-2020 03:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Diaphone Jim (Post 1058489)
Kind of brings ol' Mitt Romney to mind.

Yep.:lol2:

xoxoxoBruce 09-24-2020 10:03 PM

In the outback there's nothing on the side of the road to see. Everything worth looking at is up in the sky or a quarter mile from the road. :haha:

xoxoxoBruce 10-02-2020 04:06 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Never saw a Desoto truck, I wonder if the were made in Canada or elsewhere?
Maybe just for sales to the government?

Attachment 71649


Edit:
Quote:

DeSoto trucks
The DeSoto brand was badge-engineered sporadically on Dodge trucks made in Argentina (for the D-100 and the D-400 since 1960 to 1965), Australia, Spain, Turkey and the United Kingdom. Chrysler ended its truck operations in international markets in 1970.


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