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xoxoxoBruce 12-14-2017 05:12 PM

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So damn pretty. Notice the cog belt drive on the Merkel.

BigV 12-14-2017 09:08 PM

one man's Automodule is another man's Pussymobile.

xoxoxoBruce 12-17-2017 09:56 AM

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Also this '08 Harley. An '07 sold last year for $715,000.

xoxoxoBruce 12-19-2017 08:38 PM

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A clever quick fix for a bad wiper.

BigV 12-19-2017 09:27 PM

that's one damn big clothespin

fargon 12-19-2017 09:41 PM

What V said.

xoxoxoBruce 12-23-2017 12:05 AM

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Ford's X-8 motors...

xoxoxoBruce 12-26-2017 01:10 AM

This video shows a Rolex Submariner being disassembled, cleaned, and reassembled.
Looked to me for the first couple minutes he was turning screws clockwise to remove them. :confused: Maybe I'm drunk.


sexobon 12-26-2017 01:54 PM

It's a mechanical watch (autowind) with rotating gears. The left hand thread may keep the screws from backing out over the years from directional micro torque or vibration. They may even make all of them left handed; so, same size screws used for different purposes in the watch will be interchangeable and can be modified to different lengths.

It might be somewhat like one bicycle pedal being reverse threaded, even though the pedal rotates on its shaft, so it won't eventually back out. That's my guess.

xoxoxoBruce 12-26-2017 02:07 PM

You may be right but I don't think they're all the same, after the first couple minutes he's turning the driver the other way.

sexobon 12-26-2017 04:48 PM

Yeah, meshing gears would turn in opposite directions.

xoxoxoBruce 12-27-2017 06:06 PM

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1942 Lincoln Zephyr, I guess a funeral flower car. Very few 1942 models were made of any model/brand but I guess the funeral business was booming.

Happy Monkey 12-28-2017 01:25 AM

Turn the cab around and its the Batmobile.

Griff 12-28-2017 09:48 AM

Pretty badass, they were doing a stroke of business back then though.

Gravdigr 12-28-2017 05:02 PM

The bodies do pile up when you're saving the world.

xoxoxoBruce 12-29-2017 09:51 AM

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He was a machinist specializing in bearings, didn't know anything about bikes so he had to learn, find missing parts and put it together.

BigV 12-29-2017 09:39 PM

This is his jam:


Carruthers 01-12-2018 05:27 PM

The importance of the man-machine interface cannot be overstated.


xoxoxoBruce 01-12-2018 09:21 PM

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Great idea, instead of hitting a critter in the road with the front wheel throwing you into the ditch, straddle it and crush that fucker with the rear wheel. Just a butt bump instead of a nose skinning.

xoxoxoBruce 01-15-2018 10:03 PM

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Wanna buy a motorcycle?

xoxoxoBruce 01-24-2018 12:00 PM

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Clever gas saving tip, only put 5 carbs on a 6 cylinder engine. :lol2:

BigV 01-24-2018 01:28 PM

Had to count spark plug wires...

Gravdigr 01-25-2018 05:16 PM

This one time, I owned a car with an eight cylinder engine, and it only had one carb.

:jig:

xoxoxoBruce 01-25-2018 07:49 PM

Wow, you must have gotten great gas mileage.;)

xoxoxoBruce 02-05-2018 08:03 PM

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'35 Plymouth coup in a foot of snow at 25 below...

xoxoxoBruce 02-06-2018 04:17 PM

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More on the mailman...

Quote:

An outtake from the Jan 18, 1943 feature: "LIFE Rides the Route of a Rural Mailman in Vermont." According to LIFE, "To the country people around East Dorset, Vt., the sight of Mark Whalon's coonskin cap and the rattle of the mailbox are as welcome as the sun. For 17 years now he has been delivering the mail to 80 families on the route...The day LIFE Photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt went round the route the thermometer fell to 35 degrees below zero. The snow was twelve inches deep and they had to get out a team on East Barn Road and haul the mailman's 1935 Plymouth coupe through the drifts." (Alfred Eisenstaedt—The LIFE Picture

glatt 02-06-2018 04:22 PM

Tying off to the bumper and knowing it will hold.

Griff 02-07-2018 08:54 AM

Yeah no fussing with that.

xoxoxoBruce 02-12-2018 01:05 AM

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Apocalypse machine, 300 mile range with three tanks, shovel, axe, saw, rope, and what looks like a high tech crossbow.

sexobon 02-12-2018 01:44 AM

Pedals to crank it over so you don't need a battery. I like it!

xoxoxoBruce 02-14-2018 11:26 PM

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New one on me, never heard on them. That's $459,000 2017 dollars.

Carruthers 02-15-2018 05:40 AM

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Given that the driving position is above the bogey axle, my first thoughts were that the vehicle had perhaps been designed for use in circumstances that required maximum manoeuvrability, eg cargo handling at ports, warehousing etc. However, flat bed vehicles always seem to get that job for obvious reasons.

Quote:

Needing a new product to bring to market in October of 1950 the firm introduced a new concept vehicle the Fageol “Super Freighter.”
This unique truck was a self-propelled trailer minus the tractor with the driver’s compartment located up front, and the engine mounted in the middle of the vehicle below the floor.
Quote:

The demonstrator, fabricated in 1950 as part of an effort to land an Army contract for 1,650 vehicles. The Fruehauf Trailer Corporation constructed the stainless body, and the front of it was mounted on a steerable bogey axle with hydraulically actuated controls.
Quote:

It appears the effort only resulted in one “Cargoliner” being built...
Link.

When it came to manoeuvrability, the Scammell Scarab was the machine for the job by all accounts.
It was a peculiar little vehicle that was much used on the railways and in ports.
I can't help but think that cornering at any speed above walking pace would have been a character forming experience.

Attachment 63205

Attachment 63206

Link

Gravdigr 02-15-2018 03:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Carruthers (Post 1004087)
I can't help but think that cornering at any speed above walking pace would have been a character forming experience.

Have you ever driven a Reliant Robin?:D

Carruthers 02-15-2018 04:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gravdigr (Post 1004111)
Have you ever driven a Reliant Robin?:D

That is one of life's 'pleasures' I am happy to have avoided. ;)

Once, on a visit to the local fire station, one of the crew was talking about road accidents and the subject of the Reliant Robin came up.

'They burn quite nicely' was all he said. :eek:

limey 02-15-2018 04:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gravdigr (Post 1004111)
Have you ever driven a Reliant Robin?:D



I have! Funny clicky little gear lever. Cornering didn’t trouble me, but then I can’t ride a bike, and commuted to work in London in the early eighties on a Pashley trike .....


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Gravdigr 02-15-2018 10:16 PM

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I'd like to drive one. But, I don't think I'd be comfortable driving/riding in a car that fond of belly rubs.

Attachment 63212

xoxoxoBruce 02-15-2018 10:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by limey (Post 1004118)
but then I can’t ride a bike

Balderdash, there ain't nothing you can't do. http://cellar.org/2012/nono.gif

xoxoxoBruce 02-19-2018 03:42 PM

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As if flying cars aren't bad enough, this one is Evinrude powered... :rolleyes:

Gravdigr 02-19-2018 03:51 PM

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Brooks Stevens. Here's another of his designs:

Attachment 63235

:devil:

xoxoxoBruce 02-24-2018 08:25 PM

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With a little help from his friends...

xoxoxoBruce 03-01-2018 11:36 PM

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God damn, I love this tractor. Chopped top, full fendered, big&littles, would look great in B-Gas. :yesnod:

captainhook455 03-02-2018 08:01 AM

Yeah^^^, but do the windows roll down for summer plowing?

xoxoxoBruce 03-02-2018 08:28 AM

The top comes off. One just sold for $200,000, I doubt it will be plowing.

Griff 03-02-2018 08:55 AM

That is gorgeous. It's time for me to get in the vintage tractor business. I could get one of Dad's worked on but I'd rather get an old utility.

xoxoxoBruce 03-04-2018 12:43 AM

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Not all motorcycles were for racing or profiling, some were working bikes.

Carruthers 03-04-2018 04:13 AM

Shoes horses as well, assuming the box amidships actually contains shoes.

Do you have a link for that image please, Bruce?
A Google image search didn't bear fruit and I'd be interested to know the where and when of it.
I'd hazard a guess at London about 1950.
Pickfords is still going strong by the way.

Gravdigr 03-04-2018 06:53 PM

Don't know if it'll help, but, here's a TinEye link.

fargon 03-04-2018 09:32 PM

I wish there was a story to go along with the picture.

Carruthers 03-05-2018 04:33 AM

Thank you, Grav. That's brilliant!

Your second link nails it down...

Quote:

In the age of automation, the blacksmith is giving way to the 'agricultural engineer'.
The few smiths who have survived have had to make concessions to the modern age, like Bill Groom, from Slough in Berkshire, who takes his smithy, complete with forge, in a motorcycle sidecar to wherever his services are required.
He even finds an occasional job in town, here he is sharpening picks which are being used for road repair work.

Taken September 1st 1955.

That has led me to another picture which is plastered with copyright warnings but viewable here: Link

It's an old family firm run by two brothers, one of whom is 'the welter-weight wrestling champion of England'.

One more image of Groom Bros at work here...

Link

As far as the location of the image in Bruce's post #345 is concerned, my assumption is that it is indeed Slough and probably the High Street.

I've had a look at Street View but find that it is now a pedestrian area and unrecognisable.

The captions describe Slough as being in Berkshire. At the time the photographs were taken it was in Buckinghamshire.

There was a local government reshuffle in 1972 (I think) and county boundaries were shifted.

The town is north of Windsor on the other side of the Thames so if any of you are going to Harry and Meghan's nuptials in May, you'll be able to nip across the river for the rest of the day and see the place for yourselves.

Once again, thanks Grav. :thumb:

Griff 03-05-2018 07:26 AM

That is great, nice finds!

xoxoxoBruce 03-05-2018 10:10 AM

Where I found it there's just pictures with little or no information. I grabbed it because it's a cool picture. I figured it was Britain because the sidecar is on the left, and didn't look like Australia.

glatt 03-05-2018 11:13 AM

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A 1956 Popular Science had a little blurb on him too.
Attachment 63337

Gravdigr 03-05-2018 03:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Carruthers (Post 1005036)
Once again, thanks Grav. :thumb:

Glad to have actually been of some help.

But, this image is just insanity at its finest. Imagine riding down the street on yer murdersickle with a big ol' pile of red hot coals bouncing and jouncing around beside ya. I mean rfthere!

What could possibly go wrong?:eyebrow:

Carruthers 03-05-2018 04:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gravdigr (Post 1005072)
....just insanity at its finest. Imagine riding down the street on yer murdersickle with a big ol' pile of red hot coals bouncing and jouncing around beside ya. I mean rfthere!

What could possibly go wrong?:eyebrow:

I bet that anvil isn't bolted down, either. :eek:

xoxoxoBruce 03-05-2018 04:51 PM

No problem they have smooth roads over there. :rolleyes:

xoxoxoBruce 03-06-2018 11:30 PM

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Well they did have 440's... :lol:

xoxoxoBruce 03-15-2018 07:24 PM

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I don't think I can afford this shop...:unsure:

Undertoad 03-15-2018 08:02 PM

where's the on button?

xoxoxoBruce 03-15-2018 08:33 PM

It has overhead bins for killing puppies.

Glinda 03-16-2018 01:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xoxoxoBruce (Post 1005781)
It has overhead bins for killing puppies.

*zing!*

You sure those aren't pizza ovens? For $62,000, it sure as hell ought to include pizza ovens, ferchrissakes. :rolleyes:


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