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   xoxoxoBruce  Friday Nov 9 11:06 PM

Nov 10th, 2018 : Stainless Snail

Government mandated public art paid for by private developers, to drive Henry Q crazy.

Quote:
The derelict factory was demolished and replaced with a housing development. This spiral sculpture is a result of the Chesterfield Borough Council’s planning policy, which encourages all large developments to include up to one percent of the total investment for public art.


Quote:
Liz Lemon, the sculptor behind the artwork, used the land as inspiration, as the area is known for both Goniatite and gastropod fossils. She also paid homage to the land’s industrial past. Because the factory that formerly stood at the site built turbines for many of the world’s large hydroelectric dams, Lemon designed the sculpture in metal with a high precision finish to reflect the former factory’s dedication to high-quality engineering.
Got to take issue with “a high precision finish”.
No doubt the pieces were cut and assembled with high precision, but the finish is certainly not.
Probably a case where we should shoot the messenger.



Quote:
The resulting sculpture is about 25 feet high. The spiral form was created from many sections of stainless steel sheets that vary in thickness, and the way it fits together is evocative of the types of pipework construction used in the hydropower plants that the former factory worked on. The artwork has five rows of “portholes” of reducing size all the way around the spiral. The internal cavity houses blue and green fiber optic lights that are switched on at night.
Sorry, couldn’t find any night pictures. We’ll have to send one of the Brits to take one.

link


Clodfobble  Saturday Nov 10 07:18 AM

Liz Lemon, huh?



xoxoxoBruce  Saturday Nov 10 07:41 AM

Yes, Liz Lemon.

Oh, here's a night picture...



sexobon  Saturday Nov 10 08:31 AM

I think the term high precision finish means that the finishing processes are designed to keep the parts within; or, bring them into specified tolerances rather than having to do so much with appearance. Perhaps they used precise tolerances like those found in some turbine parts.



xoxoxoBruce  Saturday Nov 10 09:49 AM

Evidently the reporter thought that too, but that's not what it means in the metal machining/fabrication world.
The writer is confusing the terms fit and finish, though often used together they are two different qualities.



sexobon  Saturday Nov 10 10:12 AM

If the thickness of each assembled sheet is finished to maintain uniformity within a specified tolerance across the entire sheet, that's a high precision finish whether or not those entire broad surfaces are fitted against anything else. I got the impression it was a hidden homage that had to be articulated. Let me know what the messenger says after you ask about it.



monster  Saturday Nov 10 10:28 AM

I love it.



xoxoxoBruce  Saturday Nov 10 10:55 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by sexobon View Post
If the thickness of each assembled sheet is finished to maintain uniformity within a specified tolerance across the entire sheet, that's a high precision finish whether or not those entire broad surfaces are fitted against anything else. I got the impression it was a hidden homage that had to be articulated. Let me know what the messenger says after you ask about it.
No, the stock sheets are ordered by size, thickness, and occasionally finish.
The thickness chosen for each section is based on how much strength it needs hold it's shape and bear the stress it will be subjected to. Obviously the smallest curl doesn't have to be strong as the largest curl so much lighter material.

Stainless sheets are all pretty good finish, but sometimes it's practical to buy it polished/brushed rather than doing it yourself, but in this case no. Ordering a better finish would be defeated by the handling during fabrication.


Diaphone Jim  Saturday Nov 10 12:13 PM

Today's (11/10) Earth Science Picture of the Day:
https://epod.usra.edu/blog/2018/11/e...n-spirals.html

That's precision.



sexobon  Saturday Nov 10 12:49 PM

I checked the websites of the *SS manufacturer and the CAD designer/fabricator. Neither says anything about a high precision finish, in relation to anything on this project, leading me to believe that the writer simply embellished the article. Perhaps instead of high precision finish the writer meant to say bespoke finish as used by another SS fabricator:

Quote:
Our range of architectural Metalwork services include stainless steel sculptures, stainless steel public art, as well as stainless steel bridges, canopies, staircases, lighting, and seating. M-Tec also speciaslises in bespoke architectural fabrication, ...

*A plaque at the site has the following information
Quote:
Artist Liz Lemon
Commissioned by : Shepherd Homes Ltd, as part of
Chesterfield Borough
Council's Percent fpr Art Policy.

With thanks to HTF Stainless Steel, NLT Training
Services, Manthorpe
Engineering
, Control Waterjet Cutting Ltd, Beighton
Construction Ltd
Jon English Developments Ltd, Eastwood & Partners
and Fibrelight.

Nov. 2003



Griff  Saturday Nov 10 01:34 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by monster View Post
I love it.
Yep. Super-cool.


monster  Saturday Nov 10 06:13 PM

...and the fact that it looks good both night and day.

They're waaaaay into public art in this city, and let me tell you they're spending megabucks on absolute crap IMO.

look at this $100K shit!



sexobon  Saturday Nov 10 06:42 PM

You can decorate those yourself, like these.



xoxoxoBruce  Saturday Nov 10 11:41 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by monster View Post
...and the fact that it looks good both night and day.

They're waaaaay into public art in this city, and let me tell you they're spending megabucks on absolute crap IMO.
At least they came up with cool manhole covers.



xoxoxoBruce  Saturday Nov 10 11:50 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by sexobon View Post
Perhaps instead of high precision finish the writer meant to say bespoke finish as used by another SS fabricator:
Yes, I think this is a case of justified shoot-the-messenger for mixing up fit and finish.
Most people probably wouldn't pick up on it, only those of us that know how it works.

Say you're building refrigerators with a brushed or polished SS door panel. Usually it would be smart to order those panels ready to use, rather than create the finish you want inhouse.


monster  Sunday Nov 11 10:09 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by xoxoxoBruce View Post
yes, and our traffic boxes are pretty fancy too

...and we have David Zinn

still a pile of expensive scrap on Stadium Bridge, though.


xoxoxoBruce  Sunday Nov 11 10:42 AM

Ah, vinyl wrapped. Genius! Relatively easy to repair if they get damaged by accident or vandalism.



BigV  Sunday Nov 11 02:15 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by monster View Post
...and the fact that it looks good both night and day.

They're waaaaay into public art in this city, and let me tell you they're spending megabucks on absolute crap IMO.

look at this $100K shit!
Maybe we're doing it wrong...


Quote:
“To see all of these effects you have to actually spend time looking at Leaven in a mindful way,” Brush wrote



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