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   CaliforniaMama  Tuesday Dec 17 12:57 PM

December 17, 2013 - Bixby Bridge




Bixby Bridge was my first bridge-love. I loved driving across this bridge.



A while back, I told a story about me and my friends out for an evening adventure and coming across this rock that had a sign that said “Do Not Lean On Rock.” Being teens and feeling invincible we had to try to push this rock over the edge. We failed.



This is a view shows a bit of the path on the other side of the rock. When we were there, there were no other boulders along cliff. Looks like the sign has taken some abuse as well.

Thanks to The Travel Channel and photographer Paul Giamou of Aurora Photos for the first gorgeous view.

Olasis gets credit for the historical image of the bridge.

Thanks to Pacific Coast Cycle for a Cause for the biker’s perspective.



Lamplighter  Tuesday Dec 17 01:30 PM

'Tis an iconic scene

Although I grew up in LA, this bridge has always symbolized to me
the change-over to better a life style

... going north



xoxoxoBruce  Tuesday Dec 17 07:13 PM

A couple years ago I read an article about the seismic retrofit in the 90's, it was very interesting what they did, how they did it, and what constraints were put on the project so they wouldn't spoil the shape so many people love.
The tourists, won't somebody please think of the tourists.



lumberjim  Tuesday Dec 17 11:29 PM

I'm picturing Dr David Banner walking slowly across that bridge with his knapsack slung over his shoulder.



SPUCK  Wednesday Dec 18 07:29 AM

The word "spindly" comes to mind.



Sheldonrs  Wednesday Dec 18 10:55 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by lumberjim View Post
I'm picturing Dr David Banner walking slowly across that bridge with his knapsack slung over his shoulder.
Don't make him angry. You wouldn't like him when he's angry.


Gravdigr  Thursday Dec 19 02:37 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by lumberjim View Post
I'm picturing Dr David Banner walking slowly across that bridge with his knapsack slung over his shoulder.
You forgot the piano music.


Lamplighter  Friday Dec 20 03:58 PM

In surfing about, I came across these 2 pics

One is obviously when the bridge was under construction.
The other was a goof-up of a Google Earth image.

Attachment 46271

Attachment 46272

'



lumberjim  Saturday Dec 21 12:11 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gravdigr View Post
You forgot the piano music.
Nah, I was hearing it. Duh nah nah nasaah.....duh NAna naaaa




DanaC  Saturday Dec 21 03:48 AM

Ahh, what a fabulous construction. I can see why you fell in love with it.



CaliforniaMama  Sunday Dec 22 09:33 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamplighter View Post
In surfing about, I came across these 2 pics

One is obviously when the bridge was under construction.
The other was a goof-up of a Google Earth image.
I am always amazed and left feeling profound awe when I see the feats of construction being made in a time before our modern equipment and engineering-know-how was developed. Like watching the Golden Gate Bridge get built, Hoover Dam and the like.

It's kinda funny doing seismic retrofit on a bridge that has seen some pretty intense earthquakes and lived to tell. When the Big One hits, will there be enough people left to care about it?

Or, is the Big One all one big myth to create industry where there was none?


glatt  Sunday Dec 22 09:48 PM

We're standing on the shoulders of giants.



Lamplighter  Monday Dec 23 10:07 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliforniaMama View Post
<snip>

It's kinda funny doing seismic retrofit on a bridge that has seen
some pretty intense earthquakes and lived to tell.
When the Big One hits, will there be enough people left to care about it?

Or, is the Big One all one big myth to create industry where there was none?
Bixby Bridge is on the Callif/Oregon border, north of the Mendicino fault.

Maybe the Pacific plate is going to slide right on by us in Oregon
...and it's the Juan De Fuca Gorda plate that's coming ashore to bite us

Attachment 46283

(map from here)


SPUCK  Tuesday Dec 24 07:41 AM

That's ridiculous. We all know a huge crack is going to open down the San Andreas Fault and everything east is going to slide into the Atlantic and sink.



Sheldonrs  Tuesday Dec 24 01:32 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by SPUCK View Post
That's ridiculous. We all know a huge crack is going to open down the San Andreas Fault and everything east is going to slide into the Atlantic and sink.
Before anyone else says it, I AM NOT THAT CRACK!!!




xoxoxoBruce  Saturday Dec 28 12:49 AM



Quote:
The amount of material used in the construction was enormous: 300,000 feet of timber were used in the falsework, 4,700 cubic yards of earth and rock had to be excavated, and 45,000 sacks of cement were used. The means of transporting the materials across the canyon came from platforms and slings suspended from a cable 300 feet above the creek. Cement was chosen instead of steel due to material and maintenance costs. The cement came from Davenport, near Santa Cruz, and from San Andreas. The creek below supplied the needed water for the mix.
I wonder how many Redwoods died for that bridge?

Quote:
The falsework, which was the wooden structure built to shape the arch and form the wet concrete, was one of the outstanding accomplishments of E.C. Panton, the general superintendent of Ward Engineering Co. Credit also went to C.H. Purcell, California state highway engineer, F.W. Panhorst, acting bridge engineer, and I.O. Jahlstrom, resident engineer. Two months were spent building the falsework alone. One of the main difficulties was raising and holding the arch frame, exposed as it was to the high winds. The foundation also had to resist the waves which at times reached its base. Work was halted for a time until the dangers of winter storms passed.
Monterey Historical.


sexobon  Saturday Dec 28 01:44 AM

I used to motorcycle across it on a fairly regular basis when I lived in Monterey. Great ride, really let the good times roll (yes, I rode a Kawasaki ... GPZ 750 R1).



SPUCK  Saturday Dec 28 06:58 AM

I had to go across it a bunch of times while working on a sod-roofed house's water filtration system. They had troubles with California Condors tearing up their roof. There were motion triggered, Condor chasing, Rainbirds all over the place. We had to weave around trying to not get pegged by them.



CaliforniaMama  Sunday Jan 26 03:01 AM

Sorry, Lamplighter, but the bridge is South of Carmel over Bixby Creek. Maybe there's another one up north, but this one is south, between Carmel and Big Sur.

Sexobon said: "I used to motorcycle across it on a fairly regular basis when I lived in Monterey. Great ride, really let the good times roll (yes, I rode a Kawasaki ... GPZ 750 R1). "

Ah, memories. I rode down Hwy 1 to Hearst's Castle (San Simeon) on the back of a motorcycle. Absolutely amazing ride. One of the most beautiful experiences I've had. And to think I rode the whole way without a helmet. It was before such things were insisted upon by all.

xoxoxoBruce said: "I wonder how many Redwoods died for that bridge?"

They may not have used redwoods. Just south of Carmel there is a huge, densely wooded canyon (Palo Canyon) and I'll bet that's where they got the trees.

When we explored the canyon we found signs of long-ago logging, bridges made of whole logs, ruins of cabins, lots of stumps and roads that were at one time clear for driving.

I don't remember what kind of trees were in the canyon . . . maybe they were redwoods, but it seems to me there were other trees in that area.

Just guessing, though.



CaliforniaMama  Sunday Jan 26 03:03 AM

Here it is in the historical article you quoted.

Quote:
Large advertisements were placed in The Herald honoring Murphy's contribution. Its trucks were used to haul the Douglas fir from the railroad yards in Monterey to the bridge site and the company also supplied sand and gravel for the concrete from a plant in Big Sur. The road at the time was one-way with hairpin turns, making trips very dangerous for the drivers of large trucks.
So, I was wrong about the Palo Colorado Canyon trees. Wonder what that logging was for then?


Gravdigr  Sunday Jan 26 01:54 PM

The cabins, maybe?



xoxoxoBruce  Sunday Jan 26 01:56 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliforniaMama View Post
Wonder what that logging was for then?
Money.


Adak  Monday Jan 27 02:10 AM

Redwood is a very soft wood. Not a lumber of choice for weight bearing, since fir is so much cheaper and stronger. Redwood is used for shingles, sidings, fencing and patios, etc., since it resists rot and bugs, similar to cedar, and inside it's a decorative wood paneling.

I've never seen redwood in the structural wood grade section of the lumber yard.



SPUCK  Monday Jan 27 07:57 AM

Quote:
I've never seen redwood in the structural wood grade section of the lumber yard.

We see it around Monterey all the time. The lumber yards all have whole sections dedicated to it. They usually call it "con heart" for construction heart wood. We pick it for things that we want a little less buggy but don't need fully treated wood. Most of my house is made out of redwood studs. All the siding too.


xoxoxoBruce  Monday Jan 27 01:02 PM

Recycled Redwood, mostly from beams in demolished buildings, is available in 3 x 8,10,12;
4 x 8,10,12,14;
6 x 8,10,12,14;
8 x 8,10,12;
10 x 10,12;
12 x 12;
larger on request.



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