Visit the Cellar!

The Cellar Image of the Day is just a section of a larger web community: bright folks talking about everything. The Cellar is the original coffeeshop with no coffee and no shop. Founded in 1990, The Cellar is one of the oldest communities on the net. Join us at the table if you like!

 
What's IotD?

The interesting, amazing, or mind-boggling images of our days.

IotD Stuff

ARCHIVES - over 13 years of IotD!
About IotD
RSS2
XML

Permalink Latest Image

Dec 15th, 2017: Passenger pigeon

Recent Images

Dec 14th, 2017: War and Pieced
Dec 13th, 2017: I Ainít Scared of no Straw
Dec 12th, 2017: Sierra Railway No. 3
Dec 11th, 2017: Halszka
Dec 10th, 2017: Tuturumuri School
Dec 9th, 2017: Stretchers
Dec 8th, 2017: Wounded Warrior

The CELLAR Tip Mug
Some folks who have noticed IotD

Neatorama
Worth1000
Mental Floss
Boing Boing
Switched
W3streams
GruntDoc's Blog
No Quarters
Making Light
darrenbarefoot.com
GromBlog
b3ta
Church of the Whale Penis
UniqueDaily.com
Sailor Coruscant
Projectionist

Link to us and we will try to find you after many months!

Common image haunts

Astro Pic of the Day
Earth Sci Pic of the Day
We Make Money Not Art
Spluch
ochevidec.net
Strange New Products
Geisha Asobi Blog
Cute animals blog (in Russian)
20minutos.es
Yahoo Most Emailed

Please avoid copyrighted images (or get permission) when posting!

Advertising

Philadelphia Pawn Shop
The best real estate agent in Montgomery County
The best T.38 Fax provider
Epps Beverages and Beer, Limerick, PA
Sal's Pizza, Elkins Park
Burholme Auto Body, Philadelphia
Coles Tobacco, Pottstown
ERM Auto Service, Glenside
Glenside Collision
Moorehead Catering, Trappe
Salon 153, Bala
Dominicks Auto Body, Phoenixville

   xoxoxoBruce  Wednesday Jun 10 01:22 AM

June 10, 2009: Witch Bottle

This witch bottle, more accurately anti-witch bottle, was buried in Greenwich England during the 17th century.

Quote:
During the 17th century in England, someone urinated in a jar, added nail clippings, hair and pins, and buried it upside-down in Greenwich, where it was recently unearthed and identified by scientists as being the world's most complete known "witch bottle." This spell device, often meant to attract and trap negative energy, was particularly common from the 16th to the 17th centuries, so the discovery provides a unique insight into witchcraft beliefs of that period, according to a report published in the latest British Archaeology.


Quote:
Lead researcher Alan Massey, a former chemist and honorary fellow of Loughborough University, believes "the objects found in witch bottles verify the authenticity of contemporary recipes given for anti-witchcraft devices, which might otherwise have been dismissed by us as being too ridiculous and outrageous to believe."

CT scans and chemical analysis, along with gas chromatography conducted by Richard Cole of the Leicester Royal Infirmary, reveal the contents of the bottle to include human urine, brimstone, 12 iron nails, eight brass pins, hair, possible navel fluff, a piece of heart-shaped leather pierced by a bent nail, and 10 fingernail clippings.
Remember the witches on the board are good witches and should not cause you to pee in a jar...
except maybe Elspode, but that's just because he's kinky and he surely will ask politely.

Quote:
Archaeologist Mike Pitts, the editor of British Archaeology, told Discovery News, "The discovery of something so apparently bizarre, indicating a clear belief in witchcraft and forces that have nothing at all to do with conventional, approved religion, remind us that early modern England did not belong to the same world we now inhabit."
link


Sundae  Wednesday Jun 10 03:18 AM

I would like to point out the mention of two previous places I have lived in a post about witchcraft is pure coincidence.

Now, can I have my bottle back?



limey  Wednesday Jun 10 03:34 AM

I lol'd!



ZenGum  Wednesday Jun 10 04:00 AM

More here from New Scientist.

And more pictures too.

Here is, well not the actual bottle, but a very similar bottle, apparently.

Attachment 23736

Here are the contents:

Attachment 23735

Notice the pins and nails are almost all bent. Quoth the boffin in New Scientist:

Quote:
"The urine and the bulb of the bottle represented the waterworks of the witch, and the theory was that the nails and the bent pins would aggravate the witch when she passed water and torment her so badly that she would take the spell back off you."
I recently mentioned the comments thread on a different NS article. This time, OMFG, don't waste your time. Nutjob city.


xoxoxoBruce  Wednesday Jun 10 04:15 AM

What makes you think that's not the actual bottle?

Quote:
The bottle itself is actually a salt-glazed jar made in the Netherlands or Germany and stamped with the face of Cardinal Roberto Bellarmino (1542-1621), who played an important role in the Catholic Reformation.



ZenGum  Wednesday Jun 10 04:19 AM

At the link it says

Quote:
A 17th-century stoneware bottle similar to the Greenwich find (Image: Alan Massey)
and I am a man of truth, integrity and honesty. At least when it suits me.


xoxoxoBruce  Wednesday Jun 10 04:28 AM

That is strange. They show the CT scans and contents of the actual bottle, but not the real bottle itself.



ZenGum  Wednesday Jun 10 05:14 AM

My guess is that the actual bottle is very dirty or damaged or something. Or cursed.



classicman  Wednesday Jun 10 08:50 AM

... or has pee in it and they dinna wanna get to close



Shawnee123  Wednesday Jun 10 09:39 AM

I'd rather have a witch bottle in front of me than a witch frontal lobotomy.



Sheldonrs  Wednesday Jun 10 09:43 AM

Why is it that when they find a bottle with piss in it that was buried 200+ years ago, it's called an "archeological find" but when they found dozens of jars of piss from Howard hughes, he was just nuts?
Maybe he just had more witches to deal with.



TheMercenary  Wednesday Jun 10 10:29 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ZenGum View Post
More here from New Scientist.

And more pictures too.

Here is, well not the actual bottle, but a very similar bottle, apparently.

Attachment 23736

Here are the contents:

Attachment 23735

Notice the pins and nails are almost all bent. Quoth the boffin in New Scientist:


I recently mentioned the comments thread on a different NS article. This time, OMFG, don't waste your time. Nutjob city.
Very interesting. Thanks for the lesson.


sweasel  Wednesday Jun 10 01:02 PM

Also to be found in old houses in Britain: dried horseheads, mummified cats and deliberately concealed clothing. And the hell it stopped in the 17th C.

The peak of our roof (and several other old rooves around here) has the bottom of a bottle cemented in. The locals shrug and look embarrassed. One day, I'll get a ladder and see if it's a whole bottle, or what. I'd hate to miss out on some 400 year old bent nails and pee.



Sundae  Wednesday Jun 10 01:05 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sheldonrs View Post
Why is it that when they find a bottle with piss in it that was buried 200+ years ago, it's called an "archeological find" but when they found dozens of jars of piss from Howard hughes, he was just nuts?
Because he used to offer it to guests with olives and cheese?


Sheldonrs  Wednesday Jun 10 01:15 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundae Girl View Post
Because he used to offer it to guests with olives and cheese?
Urine trouble then. :-)


Gravdigr  Wednesday Jun 10 05:32 PM

Quote quote: ...reveal the contents of the bottle to include human urine, brimstone, 12 iron nails, eight brass pins, hair, possible navel fluff, a piece of heart-shaped leather pierced by a bent nail, and 10 fingernail clippings. end quote quote

O.K. Who found the recipe for my duck glaze??



Shawnee123  Wednesday Jun 10 06:53 PM

Possible navel fluff? It's either navel fluff, or it's not. Unless, navel fluff is optional, in which case I need to know how much more effective the witch bottle is WITH navel fluff before I decide if I really want to go digging around in there.



TheMercenary  Thursday Jun 11 09:27 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by sweasel View Post
Also to be found in old houses in Britain: dried horseheads, mummified cats and deliberately concealed clothing. And the hell it stopped in the 17th C.

The peak of our roof (and several other old rooves around here) has the bottom of a bottle cemented in. The locals shrug and look embarrassed. One day, I'll get a ladder and see if it's a whole bottle, or what. I'd hate to miss out on some 400 year old bent nails and pee.
More coolness.


Your reply here?

The Cellar Image of the Day is just a section of a larger web community: a bunch of interesting folks talking about everything. Add your two cents to IotD by joining the Cellar.